• ru
  • Language: en

User Tracking

Recording Which User Changed a Model

There are four documented ways to attach users to a tracked change:

1. Use the HistoryRequestMiddleware. The middleware sets the User instance that made the request as the history_user on the history table.

2. Use simple_history.admin.SimpleHistoryAdmin. Under the hood, SimpleHistoryAdmin actually sets the _history_user on the object to attach the user to the tracked change by overriding the save_model method.

3. Assign a user to the _history_user attribute of the object as described in the _history_user section.

4. Track the user using an explicit history_user_id, which is described in Manually Track User Model. This method is particularly useful when using multiple databases (where your user model lives in a separate database to your historical model), or when using a user that doesn’t live within the Django app (i.e. a user model retrieved from an API).

Using _history_user to Record Which User Changed a Model

To denote which user changed a model, assign a _history_user attribute on your model.

For example if you have a changed_by field on your model that records which user last changed the model, you could create a _history_user property referencing the changed_by field:

from django.db import models
from simple_history.models import HistoricalRecords

class Poll(models.Model):
    question = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    pub_date = models.DateTimeField('date published')
    changed_by = models.ForeignKey('auth.User')
    history = HistoricalRecords()

    @property
    def _history_user(self):
        return self.changed_by

    @_history_user.setter
    def _history_user(self, value):
        self.changed_by = value

Admin integration requires that you use a _history_user.setter attribute with your custom _history_user property (see Admin Integration).

Another option for identifying the change user is by providing a function via get_user. If provided it will be called everytime that the history_user needs to be identified with the following key word arguments:

  • instance: The current instance being modified

  • request: If using the middleware the current request object will be provided if they are authenticated.

This is very helpful when using register:

from django.db import models
from simple_history.models import HistoricalRecords

class Poll(models.Model):
    question = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    pub_date = models.DateTimeField('date published')
    changed_by = models.ForeignKey('auth.User')


def get_poll_user(instance, **kwargs):
    return instance.changed_by

register(Poll, get_user=get_poll_user)

Manually Track User Model

Although django-simple-history tracks the history_user (the user who changed the model) using a django foreign key, there are instances where we might want to track this user but cannot use a Django foreign key.

Note: If you want to track a custom user model that is still accessible through a Django foreign key, refer to Change User Model.

The two most common cases where this feature will be helpful are:

  1. You are working on a Django app with multiple databases, and your history table is in a separate database from the user table.

  2. The user model that you want to use for history_user does not live within the Django app, but is only accessible elsewhere (i.e. through an API call).

There are three parameters to HistoricalRecords or register that facilitate the ability to manually track a history_user.

history_user_id_field

An instance of field (i.e. IntegerField(null=True) or UUIDField(default=uuid.uuid4, null=True) that will uniquely identify your user object. This is generally the field type of the primary key on your user object.

history_user_getter

optional. A callable that takes the historical instance of the model and returns the history_user object. The default getter is shown below:

def _history_user_getter(historical_instance):
    if historical_instance.history_user_id is None:
        return None
    User = get_user_model()
    try:
        return User.objects.get(pk=historical_instance.history_user_id)
    except User.DoesNotExist:
        return None
history_user_setter

optional. A callable that takes the historical instance and the user instance, and sets history_user_id on the historical instance. The default setter is shown below:

def _history_user_setter(historical_instance, user):
    if user is not None:
        historical_instance.history_user_id = user.pk

Change User Model

If you need to use a different user model then settings.AUTH_USER_MODEL, pass in the required model to user_model. Doing this requires _history_user or get_user is provided as detailed above.

from django.db import models
from simple_history.models import HistoricalRecords

class PollUser(models.Model):
    user_id = models.ForeignKey('auth.User')


# Only PollUsers should be modifying a Poll
class Poll(models.Model):
    question = models.CharField(max_length=200)
    pub_date = models.DateTimeField('date published')
    changed_by = models.ForeignKey(PollUser)
    history = HistoricalRecords(user_model=PollUser)

    @property
    def _history_user(self):
        return self.changed_by

    @_history_user.setter
    def _history_user(self, value):
        self.changed_by = value
Back to Top